Top 10 OSHA Violations for 2017

April 12, 2017 Lauren Clapper

Since 1971, OSHA has worked hand in hand with the Department of Labor to conduct thousands of workplace assessments annually. With the new regulations and guidelines set forth, the number of work related deaths has decreased significantly. However, despite the vast improvements in how employers approach safety for their workforce, injuries, deaths and violations still occur.

Each year, hundreds of employers receive citations for violating the standards set forth by OSHA – and the cost to these businesses not only impacts the bottom line, but their reputations as well. What’s surprising is that many of these citations actually don’t change year over year, meaning we have a lot to do with it comes to increasing safety in our facilities.

Here are the top 10 OSHA violations for this past year.

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“This section requires employers to provide protection for each employee exposed to fall and falling object hazards.” (1926.501)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

To protect against falls, OSHA suggests that you keep a vigilant eye out for any potential falling hazard. Some common ones include floor holes, guard rails, toe-boards, harnesses, safety nets, railings and more. It should be noted that regardless of the height, if there’s potential for falling into machinery or equipment, you need to provide guardrails and toe-boards.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“The purpose of this section is to ensure that the hazards of all chemicals produced or imported are classified, and that information concerning the classified hazards is transmitted to employers and employees.” (1910.1200)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

All manufacturers that produce hazardous chemicals, or even have them in their facility, are required to have labels and safety data sheets plus proper training. In addition, OSHA has recently updated their requirements for these safety procedures, including the type of label (they must now have a signal word, pictogram and hazard statement), the format of the data sheets (16 sections) and more.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“…each scaffold and scaffold component shall be capable of supporting, without failure, its own weight and at least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to it.” (1926.451)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

OSHA has specific rules on how scaffolding is designed, used and built plus how to protect against falling objects, structural instability, electrocution and overloading. And, it should be no surprise that OSHA emphasizes that your scaffolding needs to have safeguards against worker falls, too.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“In the control of those occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, the primary objective shall be to prevent atmospheric contamination. (1910.134)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

The toxic fumes that OSHA mentions in this citation cause “hundreds of deaths and thousands of illnesses annually.” OSHA stresses that respiratory protection plays a key role in preventing these injuries and fatalities and describes the type of respirators that are needed, such as particulate and airline categories.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“This standard covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or startup of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy, could harm employees. This standard establishes minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy.” (1910.147)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

With 10 percent of workplace injuries resulting from hazardous energy, OSHA takes lockout/tagout standards seriously. Many of their guidelines focus on how to quickly disable machinery or equipment before hazardous energy (i.e. electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal) can be released.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“This section contains safety requirements relating to fire protection, design, maintenance, and use of fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, and other specialized industrial trucks powered by electric motors or internal combustion engines.” (1910.178)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Between work environment and the type of truck that’s used, a lot of these rules for this standard are situational and depend on the circumstance. A forklift that’s used in a warehouse, for example, will have to worry about different operating and workplace hazards than a counterbalanced high-lift rider truck. Be sure to read what each truck requires.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

 

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“The following requirements apply to all ladders as indicated, including job-made ladders.” (1926.1053)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

While OSHA does cover the construction and placement of ladders, the main focus here is on fall protection to protect your employees. They’re particularly focused on safeguarding against these incidents with the proper protective equipment in place, so be sure to read their guidelines.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

Safeguards are essential for protecting workers from these preventable injuries. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. When the operation of a machine or accidental contact injure the operator or others in the vicinity, the hazards must be eliminated or controlled.” (1910.212)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Machines can, of course, be extremely dangerous when in operation, so OSHA goes into great detail about the types of guarding that is needed as well as a thorough list of all the machinery types that will require this protection for workers. If you have any of the machines on the list, be sure that your standards are up to OSHA regulation.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

“Working with electricity can be dangerous. Engineers, electricians, and other professionals work with electricity directly, including working on overhead lines, cable harnesses, and circuit assemblies. Others, such as office workers and sales people, work with electricity indirectly and may also be exposed to electrical hazards.” (1910.305)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

If you’ve ever been in the average office, you know that wires can quickly get out of hand between desktops, phones and more – which is why OSHA has strict regulations. This section is unique because it’s not just restricted to employees working on the floor. OSHA details what exactly you need to do to ensure that electrical currents are contained in your wiring methods, particularly for grounding.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

WHAT OSHA SAYS

This section focuses on the “examination, installation, and use of equipment.” (1910.303)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Like the wiring section in #9, this standard is all about keeping your employees safe from electric hazards. Whereas 1910.305 focused on wiring methods, this regulation also covers the use of equipment and machines.

Check out their topic page | Read the full rules here

 

To read more about the top 10 OSHA violations for 2017, check out our whitepaper!

About the Author

Lauren is a Marketing Writer at Dude Solutions. A devout follower of technology trends, she loves to see how software can improve operations where people live, work and play.

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